Saturday, September 11, 2021

Gita Joshi of The Curator's Salon

Gita Joshi is a curator, artist coach and founder of The Curator's Salon, a platform hosting The Curator's Salon Podcast, Art Seen Magazine, exhibitions and more.
 
 As someone whose life revolves around helping artists (as curator, former gallery owner, artist coach and much more), were there any pivotal moments in which you first recognized your passion towards the arts?
I always knew I wanted my career to be in the arts. My early interest was art history – it was the only subject that really resonated with me. I enjoyed that it included both the visual and analytical. I’m happy to have arrived at coaching and curating. It’s been a great way to connect with contemporary artists.

In earlier years, you studied art history as well as curating. During such training, did you always envision your profession to become what it is today?
In the early days, I was led to believe that jobs in the arts were only found at museums and institutions. One of my first jobs was with the Royal Fine Art Commission. I was always interested in curating, but never pursued it. I had no idea my career would someday include it, nor did I have any idea I’d be supporting artists in the diverse way that I do today – through the website, coaching, my podcast, magazine, and social media.

How do you strive to make an impact on the art world with your platform The Curators Salon?
The Curator’s Salon originally started as a blog, and a podcast soon followed. It was a place for me to share conversations I was having with artists in the studio. I never had big ambitions for it – it was just my corner of the art world. And it continues as such.

I’m creating opportunities that are not typically available to early career artists, whether through online exhibitions, my Art Seen magazine publication, or artist Q&As. The platform provides opportunities for emerging artists to be featured and gives them a stepping stone to build their confidence and gain exposure as they build their careers.

Considering that creative expression often reflects our zeitgeist, how do you feel about some of the recurring themes showing up in contemporary art?
Artists have always explored their own place in the world and commented on it through their visual language and creative expression. Social media makes this more accessible to artists and everyone – following the news on any platform allows artists to respond almost in real time. It further exposes this commonality across generations of artists.

What kinds of qualities do you specifically look for in the artists that you showcase?
I look for consistency and commitment to their practice. I also look at how well an artist is able to communicate their ideas and intentions through both the visual form of the artwork, and the supporting text whether that be a website or a submission form.
But sometimes a work of art can just speak to me on an intuitive level and that can be enough!

What do you find most rewarding about the curation process?
For our open exhibitions, it’s always interesting to see where we can place pieces in conversation with each another, and how they work together. I am not an artist and curation is my creative practice. It’s the place I get to be both expressive and in alliance with artists.

What do you find most challenging?
Time! Curating shows always takes more time than I initially plan. I really have to look at every submission and fine tune to feel right about the exhibition or piece I’m presenting.

In terms of the submission and/or exhibition process, are there any areas of improvement that artists should be aware of?
My two tips for artists submitting are to tailor their bio and statement to the platform, i.e., a bio and statement for Art Seen should probably look different to one for a gallery show – it shows the artist cares about who they’re presenting to.

Additionally, when submitting a few pieces, a cohesive body of work is always best. Presenting a range of different styles to me, makes me think this artist hasn’t yet found their unique voice or style. It can feel like they are hedging, or at an experimental stage of their development.

Do you have future plans for The Curators Salon, or other projects, beyond what you are doing today?
In May 2021, we launched Art Seen – The Curator’s Salon magazine – to a global audience. It’s available now in print and digital format. At the time, museums were closed and we used Amazon as our distributor. It hit bestseller position in a number of categories. Future plans are to be consistent – our next edition comes out in November and builds on the success of the first, which allows artists to be seen and recognized. We also have two more online exhibitions scheduled for 2021 and perhaps once we’re fully clear of lockdown and COVID restrictions, we might consider a real life, physical exhibition or event – stay tuned!

Friday, August 27, 2021

Erika B Hess of I Like Your Work


Erika B Hess is the founder and host of I Like Your Work, an arts podcast and online gallery platform

 What are some of your first memories of feeling passionately towards the arts and when did you decide to pursue a career in art?
Like many artists, I always felt a pull towards creating through drawing. I remember sitting at my Great Aunt’s house as a kid drawing with my cousin from California who is also an artist. We would have “drawing contests” and I would always look forward to them because he was the only other person in my family who would draw with me.

My decision to truly pursue the arts came to me two-fold. The first was during my time in college when I realized I was spending all my time in the studio rather than in my “major” classes. The second was when I was fortunate enough to travel to Italy to paint with my BFA program. I fell in love with painting. Looking, responding, carrying my easel around on my back, it felt like home. I even wrote in a sketchbook, “Remember this feeling.”

I Like Your Work is quite the platform- You conduct podcast interviews, feature Studio Visit Artists and group exhibitions, as well as offer artist resources. How did the idea for this platform initially come about?
In 2015, I was a co-founder of an artist collective, Musa Collective, in Boston and it was a powerful experience. Putting together shows, artist talks, openings...everyone was so passionate! As we all know, there are tremendous artists in the world who don’t get the air time they deserve. I wanted to create a platform to share the work and ideas of artists who I wanted others to see.

At the time I had been listening to a lot of podcasts and noticed there weren't many art podcasts by women, which, thankfully there are now tons. I told my friend, the artist Nina Bellucci, about my idea and she looked at me and said, “Well why not just start it?” I had been making excuses for why I didn’t have the time to do it and that hit home for me. Just start it. So I did.

You are the founder and podcast host for I Like Your Work - what is it like sharing your creation with a team of other professionals?
It is such a positive experience. I have been able to connect with incredible artists who are not only talented but compassionate, kind and fun to engage with. In the beginning it was really nerve racking to know people were listening to me. That feeling is still somewhat there but I’ve learned to lean into it. I realize it is more a feeling of excitement than a negative thing.

Since its inception, has ILYW turned out to be how you originally envisioned it?
Not at all! Originally I thought it would be a podcast and that was it. Over the three seasons it has expanded to include exhibitions, featured Studio Visit Artist interviews on the site, Exhibition Catalogs and now we have expanded to have select Interview Catalogs which include the interview and images of work.

Each season we have grown to give listeners more resources and opportunities. I love that and I guess, in that way, we have stayed true to our roots. We are a voice and space for artists.

You are also a painter. Has running a business impacted your studio time at all?
Yes it has but all the work I’ve done outside of painting has impacted my studio time. For a few years I worked at University of Michigan at a full-time job. I loved it but it was hard to be in the studio. I love that now I record in the studio so I am surrounded by my paintings and look at them as I have amazing conversations with artists who are creating incredible work. So while it does take away from time in the studio it also adds depth.

What do you find most rewarding about the curation process?
Definitely connecting with artists and finding new work that is exciting. For some exhibitions I conduct studio visits in person or via zoom to learn more about their practice. In a lot of ways it is like a mini podcast interview. It is developing that relationship that I find the most rewarding. I love the art world. It is relatively small and we are all doing this thing that makes a lot of sense and no sense at all. Talking to someone who understands that and knowing I will continue to see their work expand is amazing to me.

What are some of the challenges that you face?
The main challenge is time, which I feel most artists face. As we’ve expanded into new projects we need more time to create them. I hit a point where I couldn’t continue to do it all so I’ve brought on some wonderful people to help with the show.

In terms of the submission process, are there any areas for improvement artists should be aware of?
Overall a lot of the submissions we received are really wonderful. I always say that I’m humbled by how many talented artists are in the world. I think the main thing artists should be aware of is you can have the “perfect” submission and not get into a show. Making sure you are applying to something that fits your work is really important.

Do you have future plans for I Like Your Work beyond what it is today?
Over the next year we are creating more tangible content such as catalogs and other physical objects. We are also launching a subscription where artists can get catalogs and other awesome stuff sent straight to their door! I feel like the pandemic has made me crave physical objects and the catalogs are such a great way to see work when you can’t make it out. 

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Gabriel Shaffer of Mortal Machine Gallery

Gabriel Shaffer is the co-owner and curator of  Mortal Machine Gallery, focusing on Contemporary Folk and Outsider, Low Brow, New Contemporary, Pop Surrealism, Erotica and Street Art in the historic French Quarter of New Orleans.










When did you first fall in love with the arts?

There have been several moments throughout my life where my love for art has deepened. However, the first time I probably fell in love with it, I was an infant in a sling watching my mom paint a large rural folk landscape. I was raised around Folk/Outsider artist studios and spaces in the south and Appalachia most of my childhood.


Running a gallery takes a lot of commitment, what led you to the decision to open one?
The power to have creative control for my work and the work of artists I believe in.

Are there any specific ways in which you feel you are influencing the New Orleans art scene?
Definitely. We feel like we are the venue folks come to, when they want to see what’s fresh with the artists in our genres and the emerging voices in our city. We feel confident we are putting on some of the most vital visual art shows in New Orleans and the Deep South. We’ve been able to create a dialogue with the larger underground movements nationally and internationally by providing a venue for artists to connect with thousands of new fans and collectors every year. We also have provided a platform for local creatives to gain exposure with that larger scene in turn.

You focus on Contemporary Folk and Outsider, Low Brow, New Contemporary, Pop Surrealism, Erotica and Street Art. Beyond these styles, are there certain qualities, aesthetic or otherwise, that you look for in the artists that you showcase?
At this point it’s really a tricky question to answer. We absolutely play to our strengths. We have been working especially hard to define our aesthetic identity to stand out on its own. We want Mortal Machine to have its own voice. Our current stable represents ideals we hold for sure. I’d say at this point we are looking for the artists who are defining the curve in the lineage of those genres. However our tastes continue to be fluid as times change and Art changes with it.

Do you predict any major shifts to occur in the art world over the next 5 years?
Yes. That we will adapt and thrive with each of them every step of the way.

Can you tell us what the name “Mortal Machine” means to you?
We kicked a lot of names around when we were forming the gallery. The one thing we all felt was that the name needed to have life and an unspoken quality. Like a great band name. Mortal Machine felt right. We just knew.

What do you find most rewarding about gallery directing and curating?
If we succeed or if we fail, it’s on us. It’s our responsibility. I’ve experienced working with dozens of gallerists in my years as an artist and I’ve experienced running a gallery for problematic ownership. I can never imagine any other circumstance other than this current one ever again. This freedom has given us the opportunity to develop a very special stable and will continue to allow us the ability to promote creative projects we truly believe in. We also love curating shows in New Orleans. The audience’s are diverse, interactive and our shows are never boring. We can get away with anything creatively here. The city has got our backs.

What are some of the challenges that you face?
COVID is the only thing challenging our gallery.

In terms of the submission process, are there any areas of improvement that artists should be aware of?
We don’t accept submissions.

Do you have any plans for Mortal Machine Gallery beyond what it is today?
Absolutely. There is a much larger creative vision for this brand beyond the gallery. If you would like to watch them unfold give us a follow at @mortalmachinegallery or join our mailing list by contacting us at mortalmachinenola@gmail.com

https://mortalmachinenola.com/

Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Artist Spotlight: L.I. Henley

 

Paper Empire: The Works of L.I. Henley




Protozoa limbs affixed by pearl joints, golden antlers framing a sea-green face. The eyes have opened, and the body radiates history: Frankenstein at its finest.

Dissecting, rearranging, amalgamating -the results are intricate beings made from what would otherwise be forgotten scraps. Paper is the primary medium, in which heaps of vintage articles and photographs become the genesis of Joshua tree artist L.I. Henley’s stunning contemporary collage work.

With an esteemed background in literature and poetry, Henley has naturally always had an affinity for words and paper. Recognizing that the written word could be manipulated into viewable works of art, she allowed her fascinations to lead her deep into the visual realm. She began cutting up paper. And adding to it. She experimented with collage techniques such as poetry erasure, blacking-out, scraping, layering mixed media, and even custom paper making. These experiments with paper eventually evolved into a cohesive series of movable, stark female figures known as her Weirdling, Dreamling, and Deer Goddess paper dolls.

            
Capra Eating the Illustrated Encyclopedia of Sex  

She begins with the face, hand painted on thick quality paper, followed by outlines of the limbs and torso. Once these are cut out, she gets to building up the bones and meat with layers of micro details. These details are painstakingly cut from old photographs of flora, fauna, insects, and anatomical references (to name a few), and applied ever so delicately.  Once the body parts are intact, she adds her final magic marks - dashes of shimmering gold leaf, tints of smooth oil pastel- to create the distinctive personality of the doll.

We may call them “dolls”, yet they do not seem like toys to be messed with. As with the Deer Goddess series, their penetrating eyes are fierce, warning the onlooker to gaze but not touch. It seems they are warriors guarding more than just their feminine territory, but also their fragility – they are made of paper, after all. With these peaceful army dolls, Henley aims to “capture the paradox of fierceness and vulnerability”.

Her Weirdling and Dreamling series inspire a more dream-like atmosphere, as if naïve to the perils of the material world. With their eyes closed they float blissfully through a timeless abyss.


Dreamling (detail)


To further bring these beings to life, Henley has recently embraced stop motion to create a moving collage in the seven minute short film “Break”, which includes a soundtrack by sound artist Jonathan Maule. The film opens with a dancing Deer Goddess, who attracts a flurry of flying insects that begin to mimic her movements. Caught in the frenzy of the dance, the goddess’ limbs chaotically detach and then reassemble (much like Henley's creation process), allowing a graceful entrance for the insects to fly within and become one with her, as if to impart the peaceful message that there is no separation between us and nature.  



“Break” is just one other medium which Henley has utilized to expand her ever growing paper empire; being the experimental, multi-disciplinary artist that she is, we can expect to be met with many more surprises awaiting us at the tip of her scissors and sumptuous stacks.

Follow Henley’s vision and stay tuned for her feature show at Art Queen Gallery this December, which will include dolls of larger scale, original collage, quality limited edition prints and more.

https://www.lihenley.com/visual-art

@lihenleyart



Dreamling


Sunday, July 18, 2021

Alicia Puig of PxP contemporary

Alicia Puig is the curator and co-founder of PxP Contemporary,an online platform that connects collectors with high-quality, affordable artworks.









You have been working in the arts industry for over 10 years. Can you share with us some pivotal moments in life that got you started on this career path?
Yes, of course! I was certainly very artistically inclined growing up. For every birthday and Christmas I’d receive the big box sets of crayons or combined kits of watercolors, pastels, and colored pencils - and I loved it! Perhaps the first turning point, though, was when I entered high school and I used my one free elective to study art for all four years. I had an incredible teacher whose guidance made a major impact on my life at that time. For example, when I decided I was going to apply to college for fine art, he helped me photograph all of my work and prepare my portfolio.

At the same time at home, I was being raised by a single mother, and I have to give her a lot of credit too. She was always very supportive of my decision to pursue a career in the arts.

Then in college, I became a bit obsessed with doing internships - I believe I completed around eight in total, but one of the most formative in terms of my future career was with a Delaware gallery owned by two women dealers. I’m forever grateful that they took a chance on me and introduced me to what it was like to work in the art world.

How did the idea to launch PxP Contemporary come about?
After my many internships and completing graduate school for a Master’s in Art History, I got my first full-time job working in a gallery. I learned as much as I could about sales and marketing, doing a lot of additional research and workshops on my own. Eventually people started asking me if I was considering opening my own gallery someday. Initially, I said no for various reasons but then fast forward a few years when I was living in Amsterdam and I ended up working for two different galleries that were the inspiration that I needed to realize that I could own my own company and run it exactly how I wanted to. This, coupled with my business partner (Ekaterina Popova) finally convincing me that I was ready, was the final push that led to the launch of PxP in May of 2019.

From working in the arts for ten years, I saw firsthand that it was hard for emerging artists to ‘get a foot in the door.’ I also noticed that the lack of transparency around pricing and how to buy art made it confusing and intimidating for those new to collecting. PxP Contemporary is a platform meant to cater specifically to these two audiences and to connect them. We focus on showing emerging artists to help them gain visibility and build their audience, and make the process of buying art an easy, digital-friendly experience so that new collectors feel comfortable making their first purchase.

Your career covers a wide range of activities, from being the curator and co-founder of PxP Contemporary, director of business operations for Create! Magazine, an arts writer, co-author of the book The Complete Smartist Guide, and a regular guest host of The Create! Podcast. How do you find the time for all of this?
First and foremost, I have a rolling to-do list that I update and look at every day of the week. That helps quite a bit with keeping my tasks and deadlines on track. I also schedule all meetings, calls, etc (with time zone!!!) on my Google calendar. Not to mention, I find I’m most productive when I have more to do. I guess it’s because I know I have no time to waste. I’m not a procrastinator either - my husband makes fun of me but I even love to pack for a trip a week in advance.

But more generally speaking, there’s definitely a lot of balance with rest and recharging to avoid burnout. I take regular vacations with my family or friends and at least one full day off each weekend. The past few years of working for myself has given me a lot more flexibility in my daily schedule too. Sometimes I don’t start working until later in the day so I can get errands done in the morning, for example. Ultimately, I make it work because I really enjoy what I do.

Are there certain challenges involved with pursuing traditional gallery representation that you feel differ from what artists might experience with your online gallery platform, and vice versa?
As I mentioned before, I really wanted a space that was both welcoming to and supportive of emerging artists, which is not always the case in most traditional galleries. That said, I simply don’t have the capacity to represent everyone. It would be a disservice to the artists I already do work with if I took on each new artist that approached me. I try to work with as many new artists that I think I can handle as the gallery grows and so far, it’s been going smoothly. Perhaps a bigger gallery would have the resources to exhibit more artists than I do, but there are always trade offs. Either way, I always recommend artists do as much research as possible before applying to any gallery - or decide if they really need one at all. Representation necessitates building a relationship with someone based on trust. You should always know who you’re getting into business with.

How do you foresee the rise of online arts platforms affecting our relationship with arts and culture at large?
I’m biased, of course, but I’m a fan of the move toward more online platforms and programming. Now being based internationally, it’s helped me stay connected with other artists, curators, galleries, writers, and more around the world. Creating community in this way is one of the truly exciting things about working in this industry and I hope it continues to seep into our culture beyond the art world as well. I don’t think virtual will ever replace in-person experiences with art, but when done right they can work together to enhance each other.

What do you find most rewarding about the curation process?
Seeing the final exhibition come together is satisfying after all of the work that goes into it, but making connections between an artist and a collector who falls in love with their work or an artist who becomes inspired by seeing another artist's work is something I love to hear happening as a result of one of my shows.

What is your method for determining the artists that you showcase? Are there specific kinds of qualities that you look for in artists?
At this point, I’ve really learned to trust my ‘voice’ as a curator and to pay attention to what catches my eye or stays in my mind long after I initially saw it. I look for craftsmanship and a cohesive body of work that I think would fit well with the other artists in my gallery or in a show, but I’d say I care more about professionalism overall and if the artist seems like they would be a great person to work with.

Are there any areas of improvement artists should be aware of in terms of the submission process?
Yes, I see the same issues again and again. Many of the submissions don’t quite follow the directions properly, don’t include quality images of the artist’s work, share too few artworks (it’s very hard to get a complete picture of the kind of work you do from just one piece), or try to showcase two different series in the same application (which is often confusing for jurors).

Do you have future plans for PxP Contemporary beyond what it is today?
Absolutely, so follow along to find out what they are ;)

https://www.pxpcontemporary.com/

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Mona Lerch of Art Mums United

Mona Lerch is the founder of Art Mums United and the Women United ART PRIZE





You are the founder of an arts platform, a visual artist, and former dance choreographer. When did your life in the arts first begin?
To be honest, I think art as such was always a part of my life in some way. Both of my parents worked in the TV industry – my dad, originally a historian, as an assistant director and my mum as an assistant editor for the news and later in film production. Thanks to that, I had my first (and last) short movie role when I was about two years old. When I turned eight, my mum asked me if I wanted to start attending drama classes at school, I said yes. And when I was ten, she asked me if I wanted to try a dance camp for kids, I said yes. Little did I know that I was about to fall in love with dancing and that it was the beginning of my 20-year-long journey. I had no idea that I would also fall in love with painting in 2012.

What was the catalyst for Art Mums United?
In 2020, I hired my first coach and it was the best decision I could’ve made. I was in the middle of my maternity leave (it lasts 3 years in the Czech Republic) and I wanted to find out what’s possible in the art world. Until then, I believed that my only option is to create and wait for someone to buy my art. I wanted more. I wanted to create, continue healing from the events that caused my postpartum trauma, empower and inspire other art mums and become a full-time artist and artpreneur. I received so much support from my coach who helped me form a solid ground for my own business. And it’s been evolving ever since. We’ll celebrate our first anniversary in September.

Creating an extensive online platform such as Art Mums United must require substantial experience in graphic design, among other technical skills. What was the process of launching this site like, and did you run into any challenges along the way?
Well, believe it or not, I am not tech-savvy. I learn as I go. I am only a human being so I curse a lot when encountering issues with tech. In the end, I always make it and celebrate. That’s one of the most important things – to celebrate your wins however small they are.

But, you are right, it’s a lot of work and a lot of small things you have to consider. It’s a process of trial and error. You have to test out various apps and software and decide what serves you the most and what makes your life easier. And you adjust as you scale.

Have you received any specific feedback from your artist community and/or audience that you have found especially meaningful?
Yes, I also ask my clients and artists for feedback because I want to make sure that I create things that are valuable for them. I think that the most amazing feedback I received were emails from my directory artists who were also interviewed for our blog. They said that my questions made them think about the stuff they’ve never thought about before. Some even described the experience as cathartic. When I read that, everything I do makes sense.

You are also launching the Women United ART PRIZE soon. Can you tell us more about this upcoming opportunity?
Women United ART PRIZE is an idea I had one night when I couldn’t fall asleep. I kept thinking about additional opportunities that would allow me to give back to the art community. While most of the opportunities at Art Mums United are dedicated to artist mothers, online exhibits and live interviews are open to women creatives in general.

With the art prize, I wanted to make sure there’s no confusion and no doubt that it’s a project for all female artists regardless of education, age, sexual orientation, race and location, who work in 2D (the categories being painting, drawing, analog collage, embroidery).

I am partnering with incredible platforms and art collectives such as Create! Magazine, Art Queens Society, Visionary Art Collective, The Curator’s Salon, Art Seen Magazine, PxP Contemporary. The main prize is a cash prize for the first three artists. The judges are professionals I’ve admired for a long time and it’s an honor that they agreed to collaborate with me on this project – Ekaterina Popova (visual artist, author, podcast host, artist coach, founder of Create! Magazine and the Art Queens Society), Gita Joshi (curator, artist coach, podcast host and founder of The Curator’s Salon and Art Seen Magazine), Tam Gryn (head curator at Showfields), Sasha-Loriene (visual artist and founder of Black Girls Who Paint). It’s a celebration of women and the biggest project I started so far. I’m so excited about it and I believe it’s the beginning of something great and truly amazing.

What do you find most rewarding about the curation process?
I love seeing the diversity among artists. I read every single word of the artist bios, statements and other written documents when curating for the directory and interviews. I want the artists to be seen, heard, understood and validated and so it’s important to me to know their stories and provide them with space where they can share their journey and inspire others. It’s also about the healing process and normalizing the taboos such as postpartum depression, anxiety, etc. as many of us faced this and felt lonely and isolated because society wants to see happy mums. To be a woman in the art industry is not easy and to be also a mum does not make it any easier. Getting to know other strong, powerful women is the most rewarding thing about the curation process for me.

What are some of the challenges that you face?
Haha, where do I begin? First, let me tell you that I love challenges because they make me stronger. This year, I actually make sure that I add more challenges to my life. I am an introvert and showing up constantly, hosting webinars and conducting live interviews with other artists is way out of my comfort zone. Well, it used to be. Once we step outside of our comfort zone and face our fears, do the things we are afraid of doing and look back, they don’t seem so scary any longer. And if I was to be specific, I must say TIME! Mostly, I work when my son’s asleep so I don’t intrude on our time together. Sometimes, that means working till late night hours. I wish my days were longer but doesn’t everybody?

Are there certain qualities that you look for in artists in deciding whether they will be pleasurable to work with? And on the contrary, any areas for improvement artists should be aware of?
This is a great question and I feel it relates more to my coaching practice. Coaching, and specifically 1:1 coaching, is a very intimate relationship between the coach and the coachee. You need to make sure that you create a safe space for your client and that you are a good fit. That’s why discovery calls are crucial in getting to know your prospect. Together, we identify the client’s challenges, struggles, needs and goals and possible solutions during the call. The match has to be perfect. The potential client has to make the decision. They have to be ready to say yes to themselves and invest in their future.

One thing I can definitely list here as an area for improvement is the quality of photos and written materials when submitting to calls for art. My experience is that artists often don’t follow the submission requirements which may result in their exclusion from the selection process. I have created a submission guide that is available on the website but there are so many valuable free resources regarding this topic on other platforms too.

Do you have future plans for Art Mums United beyond what it is today?
Absolutely. I have many ideas and plans that I want to introduce. I always take one step at a time so I don’t get overwhelmed with too many tasks. It helps me keep my head clear and identify what works and what doesn’t. I can definitely share that I am planning on launching a podcast and a self-guided course. These are plans I have for this year. Ideas keep coming so I bet there’s much more coming up!

Monday, May 10, 2021

John Seed - Art Writer and Curator

John Seed is an award winning art writer, author and curator based in California
 
John Seed with Kyle Staver's "Biker Triptych" at the exhibition "Honoring the Legacy of David Park," Santa Clara University 2017. Photo by Marie Cameron.

When did you first recognize your passion for the arts?
I remember standing at the easel outside my kindergarten classroom painting a picture of a red airplane in poster paint that I showed to my teacher. So that is an early memory. Art was always there for me growing up and it took many different forms. I built model airplanes, drew cartoon characters and made puppets. Surprisingly, when I came home from college and told my parents that I wanted to major in art my parents were stunned because art did not seem like a career path to them. They had thought art was a hobby that I would grow out of.
For me, making art was just a natural continuation of the creative drive that had always been there. I had to be an artist: it was a done deal.

Were there any specific events that led you to your role as curator and art writer?
During my high school years I had excellent writing teachers that provided me with the kinds of skills that got me into a good college and helped me write essays and term papers. Still, I didn’t really connect writing and art until I had been teaching art and art history at a community college for about 15 years.
Then, when I helped start a group called EBSQ that was for artists who sold their art on eBay, I became the editor of an online zine which I sometimes wrote for. A few years later I had a health crisis in the form of testicular cancer and during my recovery from chemo I researched and wrote a magazine article about Arman Manookian, an Armenian American artist who had taken his own life at the age of 27 in 1931. A year after it was published the article was given a Society of Professional Journalist’s Award. That award woke me up to the idea that maybe I should keep writing about art.
My big opportunity came when I was given a blog by the HuffingtonPost Arts page in May of 2010. I dove in and wrote a blog a week for seven years, establishing myself as a writer and developing my own voice and inclinations. Although I wrote in a variety of formats, including reviews, profiles and satires, something I kept coming back to was writing about representational art and artists. That specialty made friends and brought me my first opportunities as a curator.

What do you feel is the ultimate purpose of art within our society?
Art gives us all something to talk about. The other day on Facebook an art collector I follow put up some information about an artist he has been collecting. I told him (in a friendly way) that I didn’t care for that artist’s work. He replied: “That’s fine,” and went on to say that knowing my taste he figures I would like about half of what he collects. That figure is a little low, but as our Facebook discussion continued I loved the way that we could have our opinions and it was all OK. We so need more of that in the world—the ability to respect each other when we see things differently or have different tastes—and art can provide that.
Art can give us a center, something to have in common even as we acknowledge our differences.

And of course, on a personal level, art satisfies my visual inclinations. I’m a visual person and remember that as a little kid I used to be found by people with my mouth open just staring at things. In our home I have a downstairs room, kind of a “Cultured Man Cave” just crammed with art that I have collected. I stare at it all day, one piece at a time and of course add new things and rotate the collection now and then. Having those works of art—some expensive, some inexpensive, some by friends, some by people I have never met—allows my eyes and imagination to roam and be satisfied. Each work of art takes me on a journey into the thoughts and experiences of the person who made it, offering me a connection with them.

Tell us a little about your book “Disrupted Realism: Paintings for a Distracted World”. What compelled you to compile and write about such artworks and what were some specific qualities of the artists you chose for this project?
While blogging for the HuffingtonPost I interviewed over 100 artists and many of them were, to some degree, realists. Over time I noticed a lot of variations and realized that many artists had things to say with their work that didn’t fall into any convenient or existing categories. After my friend F. Scott Hess gave a lecture on “Discombobulation” in art, which dealt with movement and visual complexity and confusion, I realized that I needed to keep exploring those ideas.

As I gathered artists for the book the most important thing was quality. I made an effort to choose art and artists that I responded to and felt were both serious and original. I was also looking for strong individuals who had moved away from Realism and had come up with a hybrid or personal style that said something that couldn’t be expressed any other way. I looked at the work of several hundred artists to choose 38 for the book.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0764358014/

You offer artist critiques. What are some of the most common areas of improvement that artists should be aware of?
I often tell painters to ask themselves a few key questions. One of them is “Why does this need to be painted?” That question and all its implications is meant to get artists thinking about many things. One is that paint itself is a very flexible and expressive medium that each artist can find a way to vary his/her use of. Another is that subject matter is very important and should be worthy of an artist’s time and energies. And of course, I want to urge artists to be introspective and keep examining their own inner lives and motivations.

Another thing I urge artists to do is to make experimental work on the side. Many artists get very caught up in making that “body of work” that they can show to gallery owners or use to apply for an MFA program. In doing that, they can forget to simply have fun and keep exploring. You should make work for yourself, not just for the public.

How do you feel about the trending transition from brick and mortar galleries to online platforms?
Like many internet-related phenomena it cuts both ways. On the positive side it is very easy for artists to have their work be seen and sold. On the negative side, some art just doesn’t work well when reduced to a web image, so work that is bold and Instagram friendly is “winning” over more subtle work.

Also, I think dealers can be really important. Their vision and support can make an artist’s career and as more work is shown and sold online the role of dealers is being diminished. I know that there are and always will be dealers who are dishonest or incompetent, but the good ones are extremely valuable to artists and play a vital role.

Finally, there is so much work online that the sheer glut works against deep engagement and discernment. Immediacy rules the day. Work seen in person has more of a chance to let its complexity unfold and bloom.

What do you find most rewarding about the curation process?
Helping artists makes me happy. When I am able to give an artist wall space, award them a prize, or introduce their work to people who appreciate it I have done my job. I can be self-centered when I need to be (which is often) but curation gets me out of myself and puts me in a position to help other artists.

What do you find most challenging?
The challenges of actually gathering and assembling physical works of art can be daunting and shipping can be expensive and perilous. FedEx recently lost (and then found) three precious works headed for a show I organized in Michigan and that was nerve-wracking.

Do you have future plans for curatorial projects, beyond what you are doing today?
Writing is my main activity, but I curate when asked. I’m working on a “Disrupted Realism” themed group show for the Principle Gallery in Alexandria, Virginia that will open this fall, and another for a gallery in South Carolina that should open in 2022. As things open up more post-COVID I’m sure there will be other projects.

In the past few years my interest in Asian Art has increased and I have been doing research and writing for Arts of Asia magazine and Sotheby’s Asia.

I also find myself doing a lot of webinars. Here are some online talks I’ll be doing for the Winslow Art Center:

https://winslowartcenter.com/product-category/online-courses/lectures/


http://www.johnseed.com/